Health Impact of Tobacco Use

Tobacco use in any form—even occasional smoking—causes serious diseases and health problems, including:

  • Several forms of cancer, including cancers of the lung, bladder, kidney, pan- creas, mouth, and throat
  • Heart disease and stroke
  • Lung diseases, including emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Pregnancy complications, including preterm birth, low birth weight, and birth defects
  • Gum disease
  • Vision problems

Secondhand smoke from cigarettes and cigars also causes heart disease and lung cancer in adults and a number of health problems in infants and children, including:

  • Asthma
  • Respiratory infections
  • Ear infections
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
  • Smokeless tobacco causes a number of serious oral health problems, in- cluding cancer of the mouth and gums, periodontal disease, and tooth loss.

On your Quit Day go down this list:

  • Do not smoke. This means not at all – not even one puff!
  • Stay busy – try walking, short bursts of exercise, or other activities and hob- bies.
  • Drink lots of water and juices.
  • Start using nicotine replacement if that’s your choice.
  • Attend a stop-smoking class or follow your self-help plan.
  • Avoid situations where the urge to smoke is strong.
  • Avoid people who are smoking.
  • Drink less alcohol or avoid it completely.
  • Think about how you can change your routine. Use a different route to go to work. Drink tea instead of coffee. Eat breakfast in a different place or eat different foods.

Be prepared to feel the urge to smoke. It will pass whether you smoke or not. Use the4 D’s to help fight the urge:

  1. Delay for 10 minutes. Repeat if needed.
  2. Deep breathe. Close your eyes, slowly breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Picture your lungs filling with fresh, clean ai
  3. rink water slowly, sip by sip.
  4. Do something else. Some activities trigger cravings. Get up and move around.

Download Valor Fit Bulletin for Jan 2017